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Oracle Database 18c: Introduction to Memoptimized RowStore (Memory of a Free Festival) March 5, 2018

Posted by Richard Foote in 18c, 18c New Features, Memoptimized RowStore, Oracle Indexes.
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memory of a free festival

One of the potentially cool new features introduced in Oracle Database 18c is the Memoptimized RowStore, designed to improve the performance and scalability of key-value based queries.

A new pool in the SGA called the Memoptimize Pool can be configured to store specific heap tables that you may wish to optimize, in a manner not dissimilar to how you may wish to store specific tables in the Keep Pool. The difference with this new pool however is that not only are the table blocks store in the memory pool, but 25% of the pool is configured to automatically create and store a hash index based on the Primary Key (PK) of the table.

Accesses to the table via an equality predicate on the PK can then use the in-memory hash index to very efficiently access the required row, eliminating any physical IOs. In addition, Exadata Exadirect Oracle Net Protocol can leverage Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) to allow clients to directly access the required memory regions over the network, avoiding both CPU and OS overheads. The result is potentially very fast and very scalable key-value based queries.

A new parameter MEMOPTIMIZE_POOL_SIZE is used to size the pool as required. Note this pool is part of the SGA and so needs to be carefully considered when sizing the overall SGA. Currently with the first release of 18c, the MEMOPTIMIZE_POOL_SIZE can not be dynamically changed and is not automatically sized and tuned.

Once you’ve set the MEMOPTIMIZE_POOL_SIZE accordingly, you can then create or alter tables to take advantage of the new pool.

The following demo was run on Oracle Live SQL:

I first attempt to create a new table using the new MEMOPTIMIZE FOR READ clause to allocate the table to this new pool:

create table bowie (id number, code number, name varchar2(42))
memoptimize for read;

ORA-62156: MEMOPTIMIZE FOR READ feature not allowed on segment with deferred storage

So a new table can not be created with the default setting of segment with deferred storage. Let’s try again:

create table bowie (id number, code number, name varchar2(42))
segment creation immediate memoptimize for read;

ORA-62142: MEMOPTIMIZE FOR READ feature requires NOT DEFERRABLE PRIMARY KEY constraint on the table

So to use the Memoptimized KeyStore, a table must have a PK. These are the columns by which the automatic in-memory hash index is based.

create table bowie (id number constraint bowie_pk primary key, code number, name varchar2(42))
segment creation immediate memoptimize for read;

Table created.

Success. So this table has been created to use the Memoptimized RowStore.

You can also alter existing tables to make use of the Memoptimized RowStore:

create table bowie2 (id number constraint bowie2_pk primary key, code number, name varchar2(42));

Table created.
insert into bowie2 select rownum, mod(rownum,1000), 'DAVID BOWIE' from dual connect by level <=100000;

100000 row(s) inserted.

commit;

Statement processed.

alter table bowie2 memoptimize for read;

Table altered.

For tables that have just been altered to use the Memoptimized RowStore, you can load the table data into the pool via the new DBMS_MEMOPTIMIZE package:

exec dbms_memoptimize.populate(schema_name=>'SQL_GLGTFSMUBLHEUOFHPRXBRHITF', table_name=>'BOWIE');

ORA-62138: MEMOPTIMIZE memory area does not exist. ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_MEMOPTIMIZE", line 10
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_MEMOPTIMIZE", line 113
ORA-06512: at line 1
ORA-06512: at "SYS.DBMS_SQL", line 1721

So it appears from the error message that the Memoptimized RowStore is not currently enabled on Oracle Live SQL.

Which makes some sense as it would be very difficult  to size the MEMOPTIMIZE_POOL_SIZE parameter appropriately if any old bugger can create objects in the pool.

So it means we can’t use the Oracle Live SQL environment to test and play around with this new feature, but it doesn’t stop us from exploring a little in how this feature would work.

Let’s now populate the original table:

insert into bowie select rownum, mod(rownum,1000), 'DAVID BOWIE' from dual connect by level <=100000;

100000 row(s) inserted.

commit;

Statement processed.

 

And collects statistics:

exec dbms_stats.gather_table_stats(ownname=>null, tabname=>'BOWIE');

Statement processed.

In much as the same way as the Oracle Database In-Memory option can’t guarantee all objects assigned to the InMemory pool can fit in the allocated pool set by  INMEMORY_SIZE, the same goes for the Memoptimized RowStore. Therefore the CBO can only but assume the tables reside in the memory structures in which they’re allocated and only at run time decide if it might need to access the required data elsewhere (e.g. via the Buffer Cache, via a database index rather than the in-memory hash index, etc.).

Note both the commands to create a table and to alter a table to use the Memoptimised RowStore worked even though the necessary pool doesn’t appear to have been allocated in the database.

So lets investigate what the CBO does with a table assigned to the Memoptimized RowStore.

As the PK will automatically have an inmemory hash index created within the Memoptimized RowStore, does Oracle still automatically create a database index as well:

select index_name, blevel, leaf_blocks from user_indexes where table_name='BOWIE';

INDEX_NAME BLEVEL LEAF_BLOCKS

BOWIE_PK        1         187

So yes, an index is still automatically created to police the PK constraint if a table is assigned to the Memoptimized RowStore.

So let’s have a look at the execution plan for a query based on a PK equality predicate:

select * from bowie where id=42;

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation                              | Name     | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU) | Time      |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0 | SELECT STATEMENT                       |          |    1 |    20 |       2 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|  1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID READ OPTIM | BOWIE    |    1 |    20 |       2 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX UNIQUE SCAN READ OPTIM           | BOWIE_PK |    1 |       |       1 (0) |  00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID"=42)

So we have a couple of new execution plan steps here. INDEX UNIQUE SCAN READ OPTIM which states the in-memory Hash Index will be accessed to find the location of the required row and TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID READ OPTIM which states the table will then accessed via the rowid obtained from the in-memory Hash Index.

If we run a query that uses a BETWEEN predicate on the PK column:

select * from bowie where id between 42 and 50;

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation                           | Name     | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU) | Time      |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0 | SELECT STATEMENT                    |          |   10 |   200 |       3 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|  1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID BATCHED | BOWIE    |   10 |   200 |       3 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX RANGE SCAN                    | BOWIE_PK |   10 |       |       2 (0) |  00:00:01 |
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

2 - access("ID">=42 AND "ID"<=50)

We notice the Memoptimized RowStore is not used, just the database PK index via a standard Index Range Scan.

If we run a query that the CBO knows will only retrieve 2 rows via an IN clause:

select * from bowie where id in (42, 442);

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation                   | Name     | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU) | Time      |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |          |    2 |    40 |       3 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|  1 | INLIST ITERATOR             |          |      |       |             |           |
|  2 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID | BOWIE    |    2 |    40 |       3 (0) |  00:00:01 |
|* 3 | INDEX UNIQUE SCAN           | BOWIE_PK |    2 |       |       2 (0) |  00:00:01 |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

3 - access("ID"=42 OR "ID"=442)

Again, the Memoptimized RowStore is not used, just the database PK index.

The Memoptimized RowStore is only used on queries with a single equality predicate on the table. Even a query with an equality predicate in combination with another predicate on the same table (odd as that may be), will result in the Memopimized RowStore not being used:

select * from bowie where id=42 and name='DAVID BOWIE';

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id | Operation                   | Name     | Rows | Bytes | Cost (%CPU) | Time     |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|  0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |          |    1 |    21 |       2 (0) | 00:00:01 |
|* 1 | TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID | BOWIE    |    1 |    21 |       2 (0) | 00:00:01 |
|* 2 | INDEX UNIQUE SCAN           | BOWIE_PK |    1 |       |       1 (0) | 00:00:01 |
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

1 - filter("NAME"='DAVID BOWIE')
2 - access("ID"=42)

 

So the Memoptimized RowStore is only considered by the CBO, for queries based on a singular PK=value predicate on a table.

More to come once I have my own database to play in 🙂

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Comments»

1. TJ - March 6, 2018

Apologize if I missed but is this part of the base DB or part of one of the many add-ons or specific platforms.

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2. Oracle 18c : MEMOPTIMIZE_POOL_SIZE in SGA..!! – Enmotech Blog - July 16, 2018

[…] Oracle Database 18c: Introduction to Memoptimized RowStore (Memory of a Free Festival) […]

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