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12c Asynchronous Global Index Maintenance Part II (The Space Between) August 6, 2013

Posted by Richard Foote in 12c, Asynchronous Global Index Maintenance, Coalesce Cleanup, dbms_part.cleanup_gidx, Index Coalesce, Oracle Indexes, Partitioning.
7 comments

In Part I, I discussed how global indexes can now be asynchronously maintained in Oracle 12c when a table partition is dropped or truncated. Basically, when a table partition is dropped/truncated with the UPDATE GLOBAL INDEXES clause, Oracle simply keeps track of the object numbers of those table partitions and ignores any corresponding rowids within the index during subsequent index scans. As such, these table partition operations are very fast and efficient as the global indexes are not actually maintained during the partition operation, but importantly, continue to remain in a usable state.

If we look at a partial 11g global index block dump after dropping a table partition (eg. the MUSE_ID_I in the previous demo):

Block header dump: 0×01028750
Object id on Block? Y
seg/obj: 0x130ac csc: 0×00.3c7323 itc: 2 flg: E typ: 2 – INDEX
brn: 1 bdba: 0×1028748 ver: 0×01 opc: 0
inc: 0 exflg: 0

Itl Xid Uba Flag Lck Scn/Fsc
0×01 0×0000.000.00000000 0×00000000.0000.00 —- 0 fsc 0×0000.00000000
0×02 0×0006.001.00000f91 0x00c03e16.0177.02 —- 378 fsc 0x1c0b.00000000
Leaf block dump
===============
header address 130573412=0x7c86464
kdxcolev 0
KDXCOLEV Flags = – - -
kdxcolok 0
kdxcoopc 0×80: opcode=0: iot flags=— is converted=Y
kdxconco 2
kdxcosdc 0
kdxconro 378
kdxcofbo 792=0×318
kdxcofeo 1613=0x64d
kdxcoavs 821
kdxlespl 0
kdxlende 378
kdxlenxt 16942929=0×1028751
kdxleprv 16942927=0x102874f
kdxledsz 0
kdxlebksz 8036
row#0[8019] flag: —D–, lock: 2, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 13
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 30 a9 01 02 ab 34 00 3b
row#1[8002] flag: —D–, lock: 2, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 14
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 30 a9 01 02 ab 34 00 3c
row#2[7985] flag: —D--, lock: 2, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 15
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 30 a9 01 02 ab 34 00 3d
row#3[7968] flag: —D--, lock: 2, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 16
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 30 a9 01 02 ab 34 00 3e
row#4[7951] flag: —D–, lock: 2, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 17
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 30 a9 01 02 ab 34 00 3f

….

We notice that all index entries that reference the dropped table partition are marked as deleted. They all have a D (deleted) flag set and have been locked by the drop table partition transaction in ITL slot 2. So prior to Oracle 12c, to update global indexes on the fly was a relatively expensive operation as it required all the associated index entries to be deleted from the global indexes.

However, if we look at a block dump of the same index in an Oracle 12c database following a table partition being dropped:

Block header dump: 0x018000e0
Object id on Block? Y
seg/obj: 0x16bbe csc: 0×00.26ae40 itc: 2 flg: E typ: 2 – INDEX
brn: 1 bdba: 0x18000d8 ver: 0×01 opc: 0
inc: 0 exflg: 0

Itl Xid Uba Flag Lck Scn/Fsc
0×01 0×0000.000.00000000 0×00000000.0000.00 —- 0 fsc 0×0000.00000000
0×02 0xffff.000.00000000 0×00000000.0000.00 C— 0 scn 0×0000.0026ae40
Leaf block dump
===============
header address 364741220=0x15bd8264
kdxcolev 0
KDXCOLEV Flags = – - -
kdxcolok 0
kdxcoopc 0×80: opcode=0: iot flags=— is converted=Y
kdxconco 2
kdxcosdc 0
kdxconro 378
kdxcofbo 792=0×318
kdxcofeo 1613=0x64d
kdxcoavs 821
kdxlespl 0
kdxlende 0
kdxlenxt 25166049=0x18000e1
kdxleprv 25166047=0x18000df
kdxledsz 0
kdxlebksz 8036
row#0[8019] flag: ——-, lock: 0, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 13
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 6b bb 01 80 04 71 00 3b
row#1[8002] flag: ——-, lock: 0, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 14
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 6b bb 01 80 04 71 00 3c
row#2[7985] flag: ——-, lock: 0, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 15
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 6b bb 01 80 04 71 00 3d
row#3[7968] flag: ——-, lock: 0, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 16
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 6b bb 01 80 04 71 00 3e
row#4[7951] flag: ——-, lock: 0, len=17
col 0; len 3; (3): c2 10 17
col 1; len 10; (10): 00 01 6b bb 01 80 04 71 00 3f

We notice there are no deleted index entries, the index remains totally untouched by the drop table partition operation. So the good news is that dropping/truncating a table partition while updating global indexes is extremely fast and efficient while the indexes remain hunky dory as subsequent index range scans can ignore any rowids that don’t reference existing table partitions of interest.

However, the bad news is that during subsequent index DML operations, Oracle does not know which index entries are valid and which are not and so the space used by these “orphaned” index entries can not be automatically reclaimed and reused as it can with conventionally deleted index entries. Therefore, we need some other way to clean out the orphaned index entries.

There are a number of possible ways to do this. One way is to simply rebuild the global index (or index partition):

SQL> alter index muse_code_i rebuild partition code_p1;

Index altered.

SQL> select index_name, null partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_indexes i, dba_segments s where i.index_name = s.segment_name and table_name='MUSE' and partitioned = 'NO'
union
select index_name, i.partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_ind_partitions i, dba_segments s where i.partition_name = s.partition_name and index_name like 'MUSE%';

INDEX_NAME   PARTITION_NAME  ORP  NUM_ROWS     BLOCKS LEAF_BLOCKS STATUS
------------ --------------- ------------- ---------- ----------- --------
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P1         NO    1000000       2944        2758 USABLE
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P2         YES   1000000       4352        4177 USABLE
MUSE_ID_I                    YES   2000000       9216        5849 VALID

Effective, but relatively expensive as this requires the entire index structure to be rebuilt from scratch. Depending on the scale and distribution of the orphaned index entries, another possibly cheaper alternative is to use the new CLEANUP coalesce clause:

SQL> alter index muse_id_i coalesce cleanup;

Index altered.

SQL> exec dbms_stats.gather_index_stats(ownname=>user, indname=>'MUSE_ID_I', estimate_percent=>null);

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select index_name, null partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_indexes i, dba_segments s where i.index_name = s.segment_name and table_name='MUSE' and partitioned = 'NO'
union
select index_name, i.partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_ind_partitions i, dba_segments s where i.partition_name = s.partition_name and index_name like 'MUSE%';

INDEX_NAME   PARTITION_NAME  ORP  NUM_ROWS     BLOCKS LEAF_BLOCKS STATUS
------------ --------------- --- --------- ---------- ----------- --------
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P1         NO    1000000       4224        4137 USABLE
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P2         YES   1000000       4352        4177 USABLE
MUSE_ID_I                    NO    2000000       9216        5849 VALID

SQL> analyze index muse_id_i validate structure;

Index analyzed.

SQL> select name, lf_rows, del_lf_rows from index_stats;

NAME            LF_ROWS DEL_LF_ROWS
------------ ---------- -----------
MUSE_ID_I       2000000           0

This visits each index leak block and removes all the orphaned index entries as part of the coalesce process. Note this is a more “powerful” version of coalesce as a standard coalesce is not aware of orphaned index entries and will only coalesce the index without actually removing the orphaned index.

Yet another possible option is to simply wait for the PMO_DEFERRED_GIDX_MAINT_JOB job to run (scheduled by default during the 2am maintenance window) to clean out orphaned index entries from all currently impacted global indexes. Yet another alternative is to manually run the dbms_part.cleanup_gidx procedure which is in turn called by this job:

SQL> exec dbms_part.cleanup_gidx;

PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.

SQL> select index_name, null partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_indexes i, dba_segments s where i.index_name = s.segment_name and table_name='MUSE' and partitioned = 'NO'
union
select index_name, i.partition_name, orphaned_entries, num_rows, s.blocks, leaf_blocks, status
from dba_ind_partitions i, dba_segments s where i.partition_name = s.partition_name and index_name like 'MUSE%';

INDEX_NAME   PARTITION_NAME  ORP   NUM_ROWS     BLOCKS LEAF_BLOCKS STATUS
------------ --------------- --- ---------- ---------- ----------- --------
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P1         NO     1000000       2944        2758 USABLE
MUSE_CODE_I  CODE_P2         NO     1000000       4352        4177 USABLE
MUSE_ID_I                    NO     2000000       9216        5849 VALID

We notice the last index partition has now been cleaned out and no longer has orphaned index entries.

So with the new asynchronous global index maintenance capabilities of the Oracle 12c database, we can perform a much faster and more efficient drop/truncate table partition operation while keeping our global indexes in a usable state and leave the tidying up of the resultant orphaned index entries to another time and method of our convenience.

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